Lesson 1

How Active Are You?

Part of Unit 2 - Health Benefits of Physical Activity
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Learning Intention

The students will investigate ways to access community resources to seek help about health, safety and wellbeing.

Activity A

What is Physical Activity?

Introduce and watch the short video hosted by Paralympian Athlete Evan O'Hanlan: “Are You Active Enough?

Activity B

As a class, brainstorm some examples of daily physical activity that students participate in. Introduce the worksheet My Favourite Activities (U2L1R1) and ask students to complete this individually.

As a class discuss examples of:

  • What are some low energy examples of physical activity?
  • Medium energy examples of physical activity?
  • High energy examples of physical activities that you might do?
  • Some of the benefits of all types of physical activities

Activity C

Discuss as a class

  • How much physical activity is recommended per day for children your age?
  • How do you know?
  • How could you find out?

Brainstorm places where they might go to access community resources to seek help about physical activity, safety in sports and physical wellbeing.

Discuss the the importance of applying criteria to online information to assess the credibility of the information (see Unit 1, Lesson 11-12 for more details on criteria).

In pairs, the students are to research sources of information relating to Physical Activity and places where they access community resources to seek help about health, safety and wellbeing, and prioritise those that are reliable and trustworthy.

Activity D

Using available media and resources, the students create a poster or advertisement to share the information about local services that they have discovered. These can be shared at a class, year level or whole school level to promote and increase awareness of local community health resources.

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Teacher Notes

It is necessary to discuss the importance of applying criteria to online information to assess the credibility of the information.

Some things to consider are:

Authority (Is the author of the site trustworthy? Do they have the qualifications, expertise or reputation to be able to write this kind of website?)
Scope (eg is the material at this site useful, unique and accurate or is it doubtful?)
Format and Presentation (Is the information easy to access? Is the site cluttered with irrelevant links and ads? Can you easily browse the site?)
Cost and Accessibility (Do you need to log in and / or pay to use the site? Is it available to view when you need it? Do all the links work?)
Currency (When was the site created? Is it updated often? Is there a date on the site?)
Coverage (Is the information on this site relevant to you?
Objectivity (Does the site show that it is biased toward one opinion? Is it an objective piece of information?)
Accuracy (Are there any spelling errors on the site? Is the information correct? Does the information on the site contradict itself?)

The Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) is an excellent starting point for students to find information regarding physical activity, safety in sports and physical wellbeing.